Archive for the 'Direct NFS' Category

Yet Another Excellent RAC Install Guide

Tim Hall sent me email to point me to a recent step-by-step install tip he produced for Oracle11g with NAS storage (NFS).  In the email he asked me if I had any experience with the new Oracle11g Direct NFS (DNFS) feature. The answer is, yes, I have a lot of DNFS experience as I hinted to with my blog post entitled Manly Men Only Deploy Oracle With Fibre Channel Part VI. Introducing Oracle11g Direct NFS. If I haven’t plugged the “Manly Man” series lately I am doing so again now. I think anyone interested in storage with an Oracle slant would take interest.  The full series of Manly Man posts can be found easily through my index of CFS/NFS/ASM Topics as well as this entry about a recent Oracle 300GB TPC-H result. That TPC-H result is very interesting-especially if you are trying to get out of SAN/DAS/NAS rehab. Yes, that was supposed to be humorous.

Back to the point. Here is the link to Tim’s (very good) step-by-step Oracle Database 11g RAC on Linux setup for NFS environments. I especially liked the mention of Direct NFS since I think it is very important technology as my jointly-authored Oracle Whitepaper on the topic should attest.

Manly Men Only Deploy Oracle with Fibre Channel – Part VI. Introducing Oracle11g Direct NFS!

Since December 2006, I’ve been testing Oracle11g NAS capabilities with Oracle’s revolutionary Direct NFS feature. This is a fantastic feature. Let me explain. As I’ve laboriously pointed out in the Manly Man Series, NFS makes life much simpler in the commodity computing paradigm. Oracle11g takes the value proposition further with Direct NFS. I co-authored Oracle’s paper on the topic:

Here is a link to the paper.

Here is a link to the joint Oracle/HP news advisory.

What Isn’t Clearly Spelled Out. Windows Too?
Windows has no NFS in spite of stuff like SFU and Hummingbird. That doesn’t stop Oracle. With Oracle11g, you can mount directories from the NAS device as CIFS shares and Oracle will access them with high availability and performance via Direct NFS. No, not CIFS, Direct NFS. The mounts only need to be visible as CIFS shares diring instance startup.

Who Cares?
Anyone that likes simplicity and cost savings.

The Worlds Largest Installation of Oracle Databases
…is Oracle’s On Demand hosting datacenter in Austin, Tx. Folks, that is a NAS shop. They aren’t stupid!

Quote Me

The Oracle11g Direct NFS feature is another classic example Oracle implementing features that offer choices in the Enterprise data center. Storage technologies, such as Tiered and Clustered storage (e.g., NetApp OnTAP GX, HP Clustered Gateway), give customers choices—yet Oracle is the only commercial database vendor that has done the heavy lifting to make their product work extremely well with NFS. With Direct NFS we get a single, unified connectivity model for both storage and networking and save the cost associated with Fibre Channel. With built-in multi-path I/O for both performance and availability, we have no worries about I/O bottlenecks. Moreover, Oracle Direct NFS supports running Oracle on Windows servers accessing databases stored in NAS devices—even though Windows has no native support for NFS! Finally, simple, inexpensive storage connectivity and provisioning for all platforms that matter in the Grid Computing era!


DISCLAIMER

I work for Amazon Web Services. The opinions I share in this blog are my own. I'm *not* communicating as a spokesperson for Amazon. In other words, I work at Amazon, but this is my own opinion.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,953 other followers

Oracle ACE Program Status

Click It

website metrics

Fond Memories

Copyright

All content is © Kevin Closson and "Kevin Closson's Blog: Platforms, Databases, and Storage", 2006-2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kevin Closson and Kevin Closson's Blog: Platforms, Databases, and Storage with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

%d bloggers like this: