Announcing XtremIO Performance Engineering Lab Report: Facts About Redo Logging And NAND Flash.

I invite you to please read this report.

NAND Flash is good for a lot of things but not naturally good with write-intensive workloads. Unless, that is, skillful engineering is involved to mitigate the intrinsic weaknesses of NAND Flash in this regard. I assert EMC XtremIO architecture fills this bill.

Regardless of your current or future plans for adopting non-mechanical storage I hope this lab report will show some science behind how to determine suitability for non-mechanical storage–and NAND Flash specifically–where Oracle Database redo logging is concerned.

Please note: Not all lab tests are aimed at achieving maximum theoretical limits in all categories. This particular lab testing required sequestering precious lab gear for a 104 hour sustained test.

The goal of the testing was not to show limits but, quite to the contrary, to show a specific lack of limits in the area of Oracle Database redo logging. For a more general performance-focused paper please download this paper (click here).  With that caveat aside, please see the following link for the redo logging related lab report:

Link to XtremIO Performance Engineering Lab Report (click here).

 

Redo-Durability-splash

4 Responses to “Announcing XtremIO Performance Engineering Lab Report: Facts About Redo Logging And NAND Flash.”


  1. 1 Pavol Babel December 7, 2014 at 2:27 pm

    Let’s go for EMC xtremIO, your IO will be CONSISTENTLY slow.

  2. 3 Toby Scanlan (@ScanlanToby) December 7, 2014 at 7:44 pm

    Kevin,

    Impressive white paper! I thoroughly enjoyed reading about how Oracle Time Model performance methods and AWR wait event analysis were utilized to baseline Oracle 12c redo log write throughput performance on EMC XtremIO. The results demonstrate just how durable the EMC XtremIO performance baselines really are while offering sustainable response times even while being stressed under 100% update SLOB workloads. SSD’s offer an exceptional all-purpose storage solution for sustaining consistent response times even under the most eXtreme Oracle 12c workloads!

    Best,
    Toby


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All content is © Kevin Closson and "Kevin Closson's Blog: Platforms, Databases, and Storage", 2006-2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kevin Closson and Kevin Closson's Blog: Platforms, Databases, and Storage with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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