Posts Tagged 'Xeon E7 Performance'

Recent SPARC T4-4 TPC-H Benchmark Results. Proving Bandwidth! But What Storage?

On 30 November, 2011 Oracle published the second result in a recent series of TPC-H benchmarks. The prior result was a 1000GB scale result with a single SPARC T4-4 connected to 4 Sun Storage F5100 Flash Arrays configured as direct attached storage (DAS).  We can ascertain the DAS aspect by reading the disclosure report where we see there were 16 SAS host bus adaptors in the T4-4. As an aside, I’d like to point out that the F5100 is “headless” which means in order to provision Real Application Clusters storage one must “front” the device with a protocol head (e.g., COMSTAR) such as Oracle does when running TPC-C with the SPARC SuperCluster. I wrote about that style of storage presentation in one of my recent posts about SPARC SuperCluster. It’s a complex approach, is not a product, but it works.

The more recent result, published on 30 November, was a 3000TB scale result with a single SPARC T4-4 server and, again, the storage was DAS. However, this particular benchmark used Sun Storage 2540-M2 (OEMed storage from LSI or Netapp?) attached with Fibre Channel. As per the disclosure report there were 12 8GFC FC HBAs (dual port) for a maximum read bandwidth of 19.2GB/s (24 x 800MB/s). The gross capacity of the storage was 45,600GB which racked up entirely in a single 42U rack.

So What Is My Take On All This?

Shortly after this 3TB result went public I got an email from a reader wondering if I intended to blog about the fact that Oracle did not use Exadata in this benchmark. I replied that I am not going to blog that point because while TPC-H is an interesting workload it is not a proper DW/BI workload. I’ve blogged about that fact many times in the past. The lack of Exadata TPC benchmarks is in itself a non-story.

What I do appreciate gleaning from these results is information about the configurations and, when offered, any public statements about I/O bandwidth achieved by the configuration.  Oracle’s press release on the benchmark specifically called out the bandwidth achieved by the SPARC T4-4 as it scanned the conventional storage via 24 8GFC paths. As the following screen shot of the press release shows, Oracle states that the single-rack of conventional storage achieved 17 GB/s.

Oracle Press Release: 17 GB/s Conventional Storage Bandwidth.

I could be wrong on the matter, but I don’t believe the Sun Storage 2540 supports 16GFC Fibre Channel yet. If it had, the T4-4 could have gotten away with as few as 6 dual-port HBAs. It is my opinion that 24 paths is a bit cumbersome. However, since it wasn’t a Real Application Clusters configuration, the storage network topology even with 24 paths would be doable by mere mortals. But, again, I’d rather have a single rack of storage with a measly 12 FC paths for 17 GB/s and since 16GFC is state of the art that is likely how a fresh IT deployment of similar technology would transpire.

SPARC T4-4 Bandwidth

I do not doubt Oracle’s 17GB/s measurement in the 3TB result. The fact is, I am quite astounded that the T4-4 has the internal bandwidth to deal with 17GB/s data flow. That’s 4.25GB/s of application data flow per socket. Simply put, the T4-4 is a very high-bandwidth server. In fact, when we consider the recent 1T result the T4-4 came within about 8% of the HP Proliant DL980 G7 with 8 Xeon E7 sockets and their PREMA chipset . Yes, within 8% (QphH) of 8 Xeon E7 sockets with just 4 T4 sockets. But is bandwidth everything?

The T4 architecture favors highly-threaded workloads just like the T3 before it. This attribute of the T4 is evident in the disclosure reports as well. Consider, for instance, that the 1TB SPARC T4 test was conducted with 128 query streams whereas the HP Proliant DL980 case used 7. The disparity in query response times between these two configurations running the same scale test is quite dramatic as the following screen shots of the disclosure reports show. With the HP DL980, only query 18 required more than 300 seconds of processing whereas not a single query on the SPARC T4 finished in less than 1200 seconds.

DL980:

SPARC T4:

Summary

These recent SPARC T4-4  TPC result proved several things:

1.    Conventional Storage Is Not Dead. Achieving 17GB/s from storage with limited cabling is nothing to sneeze at.

2.    Modern servers have a lot of bandwidth.

3.    There is a vast difference between a big machine and a fast machine. The SPARC T4 is a big (bandwidth) system.

Finally, I did not blog about the fact that the SPARC T4 TPC-H benchmarks do not leverage Exadata storage. Why? Because it simply doesn’t matter. TPC-H is not a suitable test for a system like Exadata. Feel free to Google the matter…you’ll likely find some of my other writings stating the same.


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The opinions and interests expressed on EMC employee blogs are the employees' own and do not necessarily represent EMC's positions, strategies or views. EMC makes no representation or warranties about employee blogs or the accuracy or reliability of such blogs. When you access employee blogs, even though they may contain the EMC logo and content regarding EMC products and services, employee blogs are independent of EMC and EMC does not control their content or operation. In addition, a link to a blog does not mean that EMC endorses that blog or has responsibility for its content or use.

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All content is © Kevin Closson and "Kevin Closson's Blog: Platforms, Databases, and Storage", 2006-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kevin Closson and Kevin Closson's Blog: Platforms, Databases, and Storage with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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