Archive for the 'Exadata Database Machine' Category

Oracle’s Timeline, Copious Benchmarks And Internal Deployments Prove Exadata Is The Worlds First (Best?) OLTP Machine – Part I

I recently took a peek at this online, interactive history of Oracle Corporation. When I got to the year 2008, I was surprised to see no mention of the production release of Exadata–the HP Oracle Database Machine. The first release of Exadata occurred in September 2008.

Once I advanced to 2009, however, I found mention of Exadata but I also found a couple of errors:

  • The text says “Sun Oracle Database Machine” yet the photograph is that of an HP Oracle Database Machine (minor, if not comical, error)
  • The text says Exadata “wins benchmarks against key competitors” (major error, unbelievably so)

What’s First, Bad News or Good News?

Bad News

The only benchmark Exadata has ever been used in was this 1TB scale TPC-H in 2009 with HP Blades.  Be aware, as I pointed out in this blog post, that particular TPC-H was an in-memory Parallel Query benchmark. Exadata features were not used. Exadata was a simple block storage device. The table and index scans were conducted against cached blocks in the Oracle SGAs configured in the 64 nodes of the cluster. Exadata served as nothing more than persistent storage for the benchmark. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying there was no physical I/O. The database was loaded as a timed test (per TPC-H spec) which took 142 minutes and the first few moments of query processing required physical I/O so the data could be pulled up into the aggregate SGAs. The benchmark also requires updates. However, these ancillary I/O operations did not lean on Exadata feature nor are they comparable to a TPC-H that centers on physical I/O.  So could using Exadata in an in-memory Parallel Query benchmark be classified as winning “benchmarks against key competitors?” Surely not but I’m willing to hear from dissenters on that. Now that the bad news is out of the way I’ll get to what I’m actually blogging about. I’m blogging about the good news.

Good News

The good news I’d like to point out from screenshot (below) of Oracle’s interactive history is that it spares us the torment of referring to the Sun Oracle Exadata Machine as the First Database Machine for OLTP as touted in this press release from that time frame.  A system that offers 60-fold more capacity for random reads than random writes cannot possibly be mistaken as a special-built OLTP machine.  I’m delighted that the screen shot below honestly represents the design center for Exadata which is DW/BI. For that reason, Exadata features have nothing at all to do with OLTP. That’s a good readon the term OLTP is not seen in that screen shot. That is good news.

OLTP does not trigger Smart Scans thus no offload processing (filtration,projection, storage index, etc). Moreover, Hybrid Columnar Compression has nothing to do with OLTP, except perhaps, in an information life cycle management hierarchy. So, there’s the good news. Exadata wasn’t an OLTP machine in Oracle’s timeline and it still is not an OLTP machine. No, Oracle was quite right for not putting the “First OLTP Machine” lark into that timeline. After all, 2009 is quite close to 40 years after the true first OLTP Machine which was CICS/IMS.  I don’t understand the compulsion to make outlandish claims.

Bad News

Yes, more bad news. Oracle has never published an Exadata benchmark result even with their own benchmarks. That’s right. Oracle has a long history of publishing Oracle Application Standard benchmarks–but no Exadata results.

I’ve gone on the record as siding with Oracle for not publishing TPC benchmarks with Exadata for many reasons.  However, I cannot think of any acceptable excuse for why Oracle would pitch Exadata to you as best for Oracle Applications when a) there are no OLTP features in Exadata*, b) Oracle Corporation does not use Exadata for their ERP and c) there is no benchmark proof for Exadata OLTP/ERP capabilities.

Closing Thoughts

Given all I’ve just said, why is it that (common knowledge) the majority of Exadata units shipping to customers are quarter-rack for non-DW/BI use cases? Has Exadata just become the modern replacement for “[…] nobody ever got fired for buying […]?” Is that how platforms are chosen these days? How did we get to that point of lowered-expectations?

Enjoy the screen shot of memory lane, wrong photo, bad, good and all:

* I am aware of the Exadata Smart Flash Log feature.

Recent SPARC T4-4 TPC-H Benchmark Results. Proving Bandwidth! But What Storage?

On 30 November, 2011 Oracle published the second result in a recent series of TPC-H benchmarks. The prior result was a 1000GB scale result with a single SPARC T4-4 connected to 4 Sun Storage F5100 Flash Arrays configured as direct attached storage (DAS).  We can ascertain the DAS aspect by reading the disclosure report where we see there were 16 SAS host bus adaptors in the T4-4. As an aside, I’d like to point out that the F5100 is “headless” which means in order to provision Real Application Clusters storage one must “front” the device with a protocol head (e.g., COMSTAR) such as Oracle does when running TPC-C with the SPARC SuperCluster. I wrote about that style of storage presentation in one of my recent posts about SPARC SuperCluster. It’s a complex approach, is not a product, but it works.

The more recent result, published on 30 November, was a 3000TB scale result with a single SPARC T4-4 server and, again, the storage was DAS. However, this particular benchmark used Sun Storage 2540-M2 (OEMed storage from LSI or Netapp?) attached with Fibre Channel. As per the disclosure report there were 12 8GFC FC HBAs (dual port) for a maximum read bandwidth of 19.2GB/s (24 x 800MB/s). The gross capacity of the storage was 45,600GB which racked up entirely in a single 42U rack.

So What Is My Take On All This?

Shortly after this 3TB result went public I got an email from a reader wondering if I intended to blog about the fact that Oracle did not use Exadata in this benchmark. I replied that I am not going to blog that point because while TPC-H is an interesting workload it is not a proper DW/BI workload. I’ve blogged about that fact many times in the past. The lack of Exadata TPC benchmarks is in itself a non-story.

What I do appreciate gleaning from these results is information about the configurations and, when offered, any public statements about I/O bandwidth achieved by the configuration.  Oracle’s press release on the benchmark specifically called out the bandwidth achieved by the SPARC T4-4 as it scanned the conventional storage via 24 8GFC paths. As the following screen shot of the press release shows, Oracle states that the single-rack of conventional storage achieved 17 GB/s.

Oracle Press Release: 17 GB/s Conventional Storage Bandwidth.

I could be wrong on the matter, but I don’t believe the Sun Storage 2540 supports 16GFC Fibre Channel yet. If it had, the T4-4 could have gotten away with as few as 6 dual-port HBAs. It is my opinion that 24 paths is a bit cumbersome. However, since it wasn’t a Real Application Clusters configuration, the storage network topology even with 24 paths would be doable by mere mortals. But, again, I’d rather have a single rack of storage with a measly 12 FC paths for 17 GB/s and since 16GFC is state of the art that is likely how a fresh IT deployment of similar technology would transpire.

SPARC T4-4 Bandwidth

I do not doubt Oracle’s 17GB/s measurement in the 3TB result. The fact is, I am quite astounded that the T4-4 has the internal bandwidth to deal with 17GB/s data flow. That’s 4.25GB/s of application data flow per socket. Simply put, the T4-4 is a very high-bandwidth server. In fact, when we consider the recent 1T result the T4-4 came within about 8% of the HP Proliant DL980 G7 with 8 Xeon E7 sockets and their PREMA chipset . Yes, within 8% (QphH) of 8 Xeon E7 sockets with just 4 T4 sockets. But is bandwidth everything?

The T4 architecture favors highly-threaded workloads just like the T3 before it. This attribute of the T4 is evident in the disclosure reports as well. Consider, for instance, that the 1TB SPARC T4 test was conducted with 128 query streams whereas the HP Proliant DL980 case used 7. The disparity in query response times between these two configurations running the same scale test is quite dramatic as the following screen shots of the disclosure reports show. With the HP DL980, only query 18 required more than 300 seconds of processing whereas not a single query on the SPARC T4 finished in less than 1200 seconds.

DL980:

SPARC T4:

Summary

These recent SPARC T4-4  TPC result proved several things:

1.    Conventional Storage Is Not Dead. Achieving 17GB/s from storage with limited cabling is nothing to sneeze at.

2.    Modern servers have a lot of bandwidth.

3.    There is a vast difference between a big machine and a fast machine. The SPARC T4 is a big (bandwidth) system.

Finally, I did not blog about the fact that the SPARC T4 TPC-H benchmarks do not leverage Exadata storage. Why? Because it simply doesn’t matter. TPC-H is not a suitable test for a system like Exadata. Feel free to Google the matter…you’ll likely find some of my other writings stating the same.

I’m No Longer An Oracle ACE But Even I Know This: SPARC SuperCluster Will “Redefine Information Technology.” Forget Best Of Breed (Intel, EMC, VMware, Etc).

Before Oracle recruited me in 2007, to be the Performance Architect in the Exadata development organization, I was an Oracle ACE. As soon as I got my Oracle employee badge I was surprised to find out that I was removed from the roles of the Oracle ACE program. As it turned out Oracle Employees could not hold Oracle ACE status. Shortly thereafter, the ACE program folks created the Oracle Employee ACE designation and I was put into that status. In March 2011 I resigned from my role in Exadata development to take on the challenge of Performance Architect in the Data Computing Division of EMC focusing on the Data Computing Appliance and Greenplum Database.

Oracle Expertise Within EMC
Knowing a bit about Oracle means that I’m involved in Oracle-related matters in EMC. That should not come as a surprise since there are more blocks of Oracle data stored on EMC storage devices than any other enterprise-class storage. So, while I no longer focus on Exadata I remain very involved in Oracle Database matters in EMC—in at least an oblique fashion. So you say, “Remind me what this has to do with SPARC SuperCluster.” Please, read on.

Off-On-Off-On-Off
So, my status in the Oracle ACE program has gone from non-ACE to ACE to non-ACE to ACE to non-ACE. It turns out that readers of this blog have noticed that fact. Not just two weeks ago I received email from a reader with the following quote:

Kevin, I read your blog for many years. I really like learning about system and storage topics and Oracle. You are not an Oracle ACE so I want you to remove the logo from you (sic) front page

I responded in agreement to the reader and am about to remove the Oracle ACE logo from the front page. She is right and I certainly don’t want to misrepresent myself.

Ace Director
Some of my fellow OakTable Network members started the paperwork to refer me into ACE Director status. They needed me to supply some information for the form but before I filled it out I read the ACE Director requirements. As ACE Director I would be required to speak at a certain number of conferences, or other public forums, covering material that helps Oracle customers be more successful with Oracle products. I gave that some thought. I certainly have no problems doing that—and indeed, I have done that and continue to do that. But, Oracle has acquired so many companies that no matter where I decided to go after leaving Oracle I couldn’t avoid working for a company that Oracle views as competition. To put it another way, Oracle views everyone in the enterprise technology sector as competition and everyone in return views Oracle as co-opetition or competition.

In my assessment, Oracle’s acquisitions have moved the company into a co-opetitive posture where companies like EMC are concerned. EMC and Oracle share customers. Conversely, EMC shares customers with all of Oracle’s software competitors as well. That’s the nature of industry consolidation. What does this have to do with the ACE program? Well, my current role in EMC will not be lending itself to many public speaking opportunities—at least not in the foreseeable future. For that, and a couple other reasons, I decided not to move forward with the ACE Director nomination put in motion by my fellow OakTable cadre. And, no, I haven’t forgot that this post is about SPARC SuperCluster goodness.

Co-opetition
Oracle dominates the database market today. That is a fact. Oracle got to that position because choosing Oracle meant no risk of hardware lock-in. Remember “Open Systems?” Oracle was ported and optimized for a mind-boggling number of hardware/operating system platforms. I was a part of that for 10 years in my role within Sequent Computer System’s database engineering group.

This is all fresh in mind because I had dinner with one of the Vice Presidents in Oracle Server Technology just three nights ago. We’ve been friend for many years–about 15 or so if I recall. When we get together we enjoy discussing what’s going on in the IT industry today while wincing over the fact that the industry in general seems to enjoy “re-discovery” of how to solve problems that we already solved at least once over the period of our relationship. That’s just called getting old in a fast-paced industry.

So, while I’m no longer in the Oracle ACE program I can still enjoy putting aside my day job as co-opetitor-at-large (my role at EMC) and enjoy the company of friends—especially with those of us who, in one way or another, helped Oracle become the dominant force in open systems database technology.

Your Best Interest In Mind: SPARC?
With the topics from my dinner three nights ago in mind, and my clean-slate feeling regarding my status in the Oracle ACE program, I sit here scratching my head and pondering current IT industry events. Consider the meltdown of Hewlett-Packard (I could have wiped out 50% of HP’s market cap for less than 25 million dollars and I speak a good bit of Deutsch to boot), Larry-versus-Larry, Oracle’s confusion over the fact that Exadata is in fact commodity x86 servers) and how, on September 26 2011, we get the privilege of hearing how a has-been processor architecture (SPARC) in the latest SuperCluster offering is going to “redefine the IT industry.”

Redefine the IT industry? Really? Sounds more like open systems lock-in to me.

I personally think cloud computing is more likely to redefine the IT industry than some SPARC-flavored goodies. That point of view, as it turns out, is just another case where a non-Oracle ACE co-opetitor like me disagrees with Oracle executives. Indeed, could the pro-cloud viewpoint I share with EMC and VMware be any different from that of Oracle corporation’s leadership? Does anyone remember the following quote regarding Oracle Corporation’s view of the cloud?

What is it? It’s complete gibberish. It’s insane. When is this idiocy going to stop?

We’ll make cloud computing announcements. I’m not going to fight this thing. But I don’t understand what we would do differently in the light of cloud.

Don’t understand what to do in light of cloud computing? Is that a mystery? No, it’s called DBaaS and vFabric Data Director is most certainly not just one of those me-too “cloud computing announcements” alluded to in the quote above.

Life Is A Series Of Choices
You (IT shops) can choose to pursue cloud computing. You can choose x86 or SPARC stuff. You can choose to fulfill your x86 server sourcing requirements from a vendor committed to x86 or not.  You can fulfill your block and file storage requirements with products from a best of breed neutral storage vendor or not.  And, finally, you can choose to read this blog whether or not I hold Oracle ACE program status. I’d prefer you choose the former rather than the latter.

By the way, Oracle announced the SuperCluster about 9 months ago:  http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/press/192208

Summary
I lost my Oracle ACE designation because I became an Oracle employee, SPARC Supercluster isn’t going to redefine anything and I still remember the real definition of “Open Systems.” I also know, all to well, what the term co-opetition means.

Application Developers Asking You For Urgent Response To A Database Provisioning Request? Tell Them: “Go Do It Yourself!”

…then calmly close the door and get back to work! They’ll be exceedingly happy!

The rate at which new applications pour forth from corporate IT is astounding. Nimble businesses, new and old, react to bright ideas quickly and doing so often requires a new application.  Sure, the backbone ERP system is critical to the business and without it there would be no need for any other application in the enterprise. This I know. However…

When an application developer is done white-boarding a high-level design to respond to a bright idea in the enterprise it’s off to the DBA Team to get the train rolling for a database to back-end the new application. I’d like to tell the DBA Team what to tell the application developer. Are you ready? The response should be:

Go do it yourself! Leave me alone. I’m busy with the ERP system

You see, the DBA Team can say that and still be a good corporate citizen because this hypothetical DBA Team works in a 21st century IT shop where Database As A Service is not just something they read about in the same blog I’ve been following for several years, namely Steve Bobrowski’s blog Database As A Service.

Steve’s blog contains a list of some of the pioneers in this technology space. I’m hoping that my trackback to his blog will entice him to include a joint VMware/EMC product on the list. I’d like to introduce readers of this blog to a very exciting technology that I think goes a long way towards realizing the best of what cloud database infrastructure can offer:

VMware vFabric(tm) Data Director

I encourage readers to view this demo of vFabric Data Director and  read the datasheet because this technology is not just chest-thumping IdeaWare™.  I am convinced this is the technology that will allow those in the DBA community to tell their application developers to “go do it yourself” and make their company benefit from IT even more by doing so.

What Can This Post Possibly Have To Do With Oracle Exadata?
Folks who read this blog know I can’t resist injecting trivial pursuit.

The architect and lead developer of vFabric Data Director technology is one of the three concept inventors of Oracle Exadata or, as it was soon to be called within Oracle, Storage Appliance for Grid Environments (SAGE). One of the others of that “team of three” was a crazy-bright engineer with whom I spent time scrutinizing the affect of NUMA on spinlocks (latches) in Oracle Database in the Oracle8i time frame.

It is a small world and, don’t forget, if a gifted application developer approaches your desk for a timely, urgent request for database provisioning just tell him/her to go do it yourself! They’ll be glad you did!

Exadata Database Machine X2-2 or X2-8? Sure! Why Not? Part II.

In my recent post entitled Exadata Database Machine X2-2 or X2-8? Sure! Why Not? Part I, I started to address the many questions folks are sending my way about what factors to consider when choosing between Exadata Database Machine X2-8 versus Exadata Database Machine X2-2. This post continues that thread.

As my friend Greg Rahn points out in his recent post about Exadata, the latest Exadata Storage Server is based on Intel Xeon 5600 (Westmere EP) processors. The Exadata Storage Server is the same whether the database grid is X2-2 or X2-8. The X2-2 database hosts are also based on Intel Xeon 5600. On the other hand, the X2-8 database hosts are based on Intel Xeon 7500 (Nehalem EX). This is a relevant distinction when thinking about database encryption.

Transparent Database Encryption

In his recent post, Greg brings up the topic of Oracle Database Transparent Data Encryption (TDE). As Greg points out, the new Exadata Storage Server software is able to leverage Intel Advanced Encryption Standard New Instructions (Intel AES-NI) found in the Intel Integrated Performance Primitives (Intel IPP) library because the processors in the storage servers are Intel Xeon 5600 (Westmere EP). Think of this as “hardware-assist.” However, in the case of the database hosts in the X2-8, there is no hardware-assist for TDE as Nehalem EX does not offer support for the necessary instructions. Westmere EX will—someday. So what does this mean?

TDE and Compression? Unlikely Cousins?

At first glance one would think there is nothing in common between TDE and compression. However, in an Exadata environment there is storage offload processing and for that reason roles are important to understand. That is, understanding what gets done is sometimes not as important as who is doing what.

When I speak to people about Exadata I tend to draw the mental picture of an “upper” and “lower” half. While the count of servers in each grid is not split 50/50 by any means, thinking about Exadata in this manner makes understanding certain features a lot simpler. Allow me to explain.

Compression

In the case of compressing data, all work is done by the upper half (the database grid). On the other hand, decompression effort takes place in either the upper or lower half depending on certain criteria.

  • Upper Half Compression. Always.
  • Lower Half Compression. Never
  • Lower Half Decompression. Data compressed with Hybrid Columnar Compression (HCC) is decompressed in the Exadata Storage Servers when accessed via Smart Scan. Visit my post about what triggers a Smart Scan for more information.
  • Upper Half Decompression. With all compression types, other than HCC, decompression effort takes place in the upper half. When accessed without Smart Scan, HCC data is also decompressed in the upper half.

Encryption

In the case of encryption, the upper/lower half breakout is as follows:

  • Upper Half Encryption. Always. Data is always encrypted by code executing in the database grid. If the processors are Intel Xeon 5600 (Westmere EP), as is the case with X2-2, there is hardware assist via the IPP library. The X2-8 is built on Nehalem EX and therefore does not offer hardware-assist encryption.
  • Lower Half Encryption. Never.
  • Lower Half Decryption. Smart Scan only. If data is not being accessed via Smart Scan the blocks are returned to the database host and buffered in the SGA (see the Seven Fundamentals). Both the X2-2 and X2-8 are attached to Westmere EP-based storage servers. To that end, both of these configurations benefit from hardware-assist decryption via the IPP libarary. I reiterate, however, that this hardware-assist lower-half decryption only occurs during Smart Scan.
  • Upper Half Decryption. Always in the case of data accessed without Smart Scan. In the case of X2-2, this upper-half decryption benefits from hardware-assist via the IPP library.

That pretty much covers it and now we see commonality between compression and encryption. The commonality is mostly related to whether or not a query is being serviced via Smart Scan.

That’s Not All

If HCC data is also stored in encrypted form, a Smart Scan is able to filter out vast amount of encrypted data without even touching it. That is, HCC short-circuits a lot of decryption cost. And, even though Exadata is really fast, it is always faster to not do something at all than to shift into high gear and do it as fast as possible.

Seven Fundamentals Everyone Should Know About Exadata Before Attending Exadata-Related Presentations.

I speak to a lot of customers, prospects and co-workers about Exadata.  Even though Exadata has been in production for two years I still do not presume everyone has a grasp of some of the more important fundamentals of Exadata. I’ll routinely get asked about how very large SGA buffering can enhance Exadata Smart Scan or how Storage Indexes might improve OLTP workloads and other such non sequiturs.

There are a lot of sessions about Exadata being offered at Oracle OpenWorld 2010 and for good reason.  Exadata is exciting technology! It dawns on me, however, that a few words explaining some of the more fundamental aspects of Exadata might help folks absorb more of what they are hearing in the sessions they attend next week.

I consider the following seven terms and definitions utterly important for folks to know before sitting through an Exadata presentation. In fact, there may even be some sessions offered by presenters who could also benefit from the following 242 words?

  • Cell Offload Processing.
    • Work performed by the Storage Servers that would otherwise have to be executed in the database grid. Includes functionality like Smart Scan, datafile initialization, RMAN offload, Hybrid Columnar Compression (HCC) decompression.
  • Smart Scan.
    • Most relevant Cell Offload Processing for improving Data Warehouse / Business Intelligence query performance. Smart Scan is the agent for offloading filtration, projection, Storage Index exploitation and HCC decompression.
  • Full Scan or Index Fast Full Scan.
    • The required access method chosen by the query optimizer in order to trigger a Smart Scan.
  • Direct Path Reads.
    • Required buffering model for a Smart Scan. The flow of data from a Smart Scan cannot be buffered in the SGA buffer pool. Direct path reads can be performed for both serial and parallel queries. Direct path reads are buffered in process PGA (heap).
  • Result Set.
    • Data returned by the SQL processing layer. The SQL processing layer is in the Oracle Database. The data flowing from a Smart Scan is not a result set.
  • Exadata Smart Flash Cache.
    • Flash Cache in each of the Storage Servers. Not to be confused with Database Flash Cache which is Flash in the database grid and not compatible with Exadata. Smart Scan aggressively scans both HDD and Flash media concurrently. When data is present in the flash cache scan rates of 50 GB/s on Exadata Version 2 hardware are the norm for full rack configurations.
  • Storage Index.
    • Dynamic, in-memory indexes. The role of Storage Index technology is not to aid in locating data faster but instead to eliminate I/O. With Storage Indexes the Exadata Storage Server software can determine whether or not a given storage region contains rows relevant to the query and decide to not read the storage region. Storage Indexes are only examined during a Smart Scan.

I hope you’ll find this helpful.


EMC Employee Disclaimer

The opinions and interests expressed on EMC employee blogs are the employees' own and do not necessarily represent EMC's positions, strategies or views. EMC makes no representation or warranties about employee blogs or the accuracy or reliability of such blogs. When you access employee blogs, even though they may contain the EMC logo and content regarding EMC products and services, employee blogs are independent of EMC and EMC does not control their content or operation. In addition, a link to a blog does not mean that EMC endorses that blog or has responsibility for its content or use.

This disclaimer was put into place on March 23, 2011.

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All content is © Kevin Closson and "Kevin Closson's Blog: Platforms, Databases, and Storage", 2006-2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kevin Closson and Kevin Closson's Blog: Platforms, Databases, and Storage with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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